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Liverpool Arts Organisations Take Up The Climate Change Challenge February 27, 2009

Posted by liverpoolchamber in Environment.
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Bryan Biggs (Artistic Director of the Bluecoat), Ben Todd (Exec Director of Arcola Theatre), Counsellor Gary Millar & Angela McSherry (Tipping Point Executive)

Bryan Biggs (Artistic Director of the Bluecoat), Ben Todd (Exec Director of Arcola Theatre), Counsellor Gary Millar & Angela McSherry (Tipping Point Executive)

Organisations including the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, the Bluecoat, Tate Liverpool and NML, gather this week to explore new ways of tackling climate change issues in some of the Liverpool city region’s most high profile arts venues.

The key event will feature environmental experts and encourage the arts and culture organisations to play a bigger role in tackling climate change issues in their own buildings – and beyond.

The Tipping Point workshop was staged by the Liverpool Arts and Regeneration Consortium (LARC) and Liverpool City Council and will feature contributions from Ken Livingstone’s former climate change advisor and a London organisation bidding to become the world’s first carbon neutral theatre.

A total of 20 arts and cultural organisations from across the Liverpool city region joined the day-long workshop, led on behalf of LARC and Liverpool City Council by Tipping Point, a national organisation dedicated to finding creative ways of tackling climate change issues.

Liverpool City Council’s Executive Member for the Environment, Councillor Berni Turner, said: “We want as many people as possible to get involved in the Year of the Environment and it’s fantastic news that so many arts and cultural organisations are getting together to talk about the important issue of climate change.

“This year is all about working together to see what more we can do to make our region a sustainable community.”

Participants attending the event will share their own ideas for reducing carbon emissions and listen to experts before exploring practical suggestions for improving the carbon impact of their own organisations.

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