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Culture Secretary Hails Liverpool’s Creative Apprenticeships February 27, 2009

Posted by liverpoolchamber in Business.
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Culture Secretary Andy Burnham

Culture Secretary Andy Burnham

The Culture Secretary Andy Burnham met with Liverpool’s leading cultural organisations on Thursday, 26th February. Speaking at the World Museum during an evening reception, Mr. Burnham said that apprenticeships provided a flexible, practical approach to building a new economy rooted in creativity and innovation.

As an English Language graduate, Burnham recalled how difficult it had been to secure creative employment in journalism – an effort which saw him working for long hours with no pay.

“No one should have to go through this kind of thing; a situation where success depends on ‘knowing somebody’ in the field or working as an intern for no money. Creative Apprenticeships offer a structured route for young people to develop their artistic talents and aspirations.” He highlighted that at a time of ‘fundamental change’ in the global economy, Britain needed to build on its cultural strengths, particularly as global demand for digital content in English is set to grow.

Apprenticeships are a throwback to the nineteenth century, where young people aspiring to learn a skill worked and trained with an employer until they gained proficiency in their chosen trade.

Andrea Nixon, Executive Director at Tate Liverpool, praised the Tate’s Creative Apprenticeship team who currently offer ten apprenticeships at their Albert Dock gallery. The Tate’s Community Arts Pathway took three years to develop and aims to widen access to the arts’ sector for talented people across the region. Pulling no punches, Nixon urged the Culture Secretary to provide much needed cash to support wages for Apprentices.

An insight into the possibilities offered by Apprenticeships was also canvassed by Andy Rooley, Director of the Sage Gateshead music centre on Tyneside, North-East England. By providing a viable alternative for those who had chosen not to go to university, he remarked that early training on the job fed directly in to the specialist approach and skills required by many cultural organisations.

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Comments»

1. Anthony Sargent (General Director; The Sage Gateshead) - February 28, 2009

Interested to read this piece – really good to have given that important event that recognition. These Creative Apprenticeshps have the potential to change the texture of our staff teams and workforces really profoundly in the coming decade. Thanks for kindly including that snippet from what I said (just for the record I’m not really Andy Rooley!).


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